Top 10 tips from one of the best online entrepreneur, Pat Flynn

pat flynn

Pat Flynn is the reason why I started blogging and the reason why I was motivated to start my own online business. He is the one I look up to not just about online business but earning passive income in general. That is why, it is my pleasure to post this article written by Laura Shin of Forbes. You can visit her on her website at www.laurashin.com.

Pat Flynn shared his top 10 tips on how to get started in generating your own passive income by being an internet marketer. It’s not going to be easy at first but being an online entrepreneur will really give you time freedom and financial abundance you have been dreaming about. Read on and take massive action if you would really like to achieve financial freedom and live life spending more time with your loved ones.

For your freedom.

Courtesy of: http://www.forbes.com/sites/laurashin/2014/08/26/smart-passive-income-10-top-tips-from-expert-pat-flynn/#5d820bc610a8

SPIFlynn, who blogs at Smart Passive Income and discusses his secrets at the Smart Passive Income podcast, defines passive income as “building online businesses that take advantage of systems of automations that allow transactions, cash flow and growth without requiring a real-time presence. We don’t have to trade our time for money one to one. Instead, we invest our time upfront, creating valuable products and experiences for people, and we reap the benefits of that time invested later,” he says, adding, “It’s not easy. I just want to make sure that’s clear.”

From what he describes, creating passive income definitely does not sound easy. It requires a serious ramp-up — often requires 80- to 100-hour workweeks in the beginning, says Flynn. But once up and running, and depending on the content, some sites take fairly minimal maintenance. Green Exam Academy, the LEED exam study site he launched in 2008, takes just him four to five hours a month to maintain but brings in $250,000 annually.

Flynn shared his top tips for getting started generating your own passive income.pat flynn

1. Before you begin, ask yourself, “Am I doing this just for the money?” 

Being able to generate passive income largely depends on your audience, and if they detect that you care more about making money than serving them, you won’t succeed. “Whenever I’ve seen people do something just for the money, they’ve failed because their intentions aren’t driving them in the right direction. It should always be about helping people and about the passion of making others feel better. The byproduct of doing that is generating money,” says Flynn.

2. Be prepared to put in serious time upfront.

“I don’t believe the overnight success exists. There’s a lot of hard work and time involved beforehand,” say Flynn. Angry Birds may have seemed like an overnight success but it was the 52nd game that Rovio created. Flynn says it took him a year or year and a half to build audiences for his most successful sites. (Read these time management expert’s tips on the work habits of successful people.)

3. Banish the thought that once you’ve created the product, you can sit back and buff your nails.

“There is no such thing as 100% passive income,” says Flynn. “Even with real estate you still have to manage your properties, or even with the stock market, which is potentially passive income, you still have to manage your portfolio. With online business, there is no such thing as 100% passive income — and this is coming from a guy with a blog called SmartPassiveIncome.com. The definition of passive income is ‘building these businesses of automation,’ but in order to keep them automated and keep that trust going with your audience on top of that, you do have to keep it up every once in a while — so a lot of time upfront and a little time after. But there is alway time involved.”

“Where a lot of people mess up is they try to build a business or create a product that serves everybody, and by trying to serve everybody, you serve nobody. You have to specialize and niche down and find a market with a pain point that you, based on your experience, based on your education and based on your passion, can help,” he says. Your earnings will directly reflect how well you serve that particular audience, and the more your message resonates with them, the more opportunities you’ll have to sell to them.

5. Before you dive in, consider whether you’d be happy serving this market this several years from now.

Don’t pick a topic just because it’s hot. If you can imagine yourself happily writing on this subject and coming up with new products in this space five or 10 years from now, that ups your chance of success.

6. Find out how that audience is already being served — and what gap you can fill. 

Don’t get scared off if others are already in the space. “I think that actually validates what you want to do,” says Flynn. “There’s a market out there. I wouldn’t see those other bloggers as competition. I would see them as opportunities to befriend people — people you should become friends with anyway.”

But then figure out your unique selling proposition, what advantage you can offer that the market currently lacks. “My advantage in the passive income marketing space is that I’m not afraid to share my failures or where my income comes from,” says Flynn, who details his impressive income every month. “Transparency is huge,” he says. Referring to the personal bio on his LEED exam site, he says, “You might think I’m not benefitting from putting my story on there, but it helps me establish a relationship with people there. I’m someone who went through the same experience people went through on the site.”

One way to begin to figure out where you fit would be to freelance, says Flynn. Although it wouldn’t provide you passive income, it would expose you to the problems of your target audience and show you how you could help. (Freelancers, check out how to manage your time, money, to-do list and despair.)

7. Build your platform.

Now that you’ve chosen your market, find a way to start sharing your message, whether it’s a blog or podcast or Youtube channel, or whatever platform makes the most sense for your target market. Flynn says this is where you’ll start to build a fan base — and collect subscriber emails. You don’t need to get the whole world to follow you to make this work out financially. Wired cofounder Kevin Kelly wrote an article about 1,000 True Fans, which basically says that if you have 1,000 people paying you $100 a year, that’s a $100,000 a year. “You don’t need to serve everybody,”  says Flynn.

Use your base to build your audience, and when you’re starting out, take advantage of the fact that you don’t have a big following to give more personalized help to your first fans. “The people who are starting out — that’s their advantage,” says Flynn. “They have the opportunity to speak directly with those people few coming their way to find out what their problems are and give them the special treatment that bigger brands might not be able to do.”

Some sites Flynn recommends for learning more are Fizzle.co, InternetBusinessMasterySocialTriggers.com, and MichaelHyatt.com.

8. Offer them value for free. 

You can’t start charging right off the bat without your audience knowing anything about the value you offer (though you could still indirectly earn money from them with the right ads). “The best way to go in terms of a long-term passive income business [is] delivering value and information for free, and therefore establishing expertise, knowledge and trust with your audience,” says Flynn.

9. Figure out what product will best serve them. 

Once your audience has grown and you have validation that you’re offering them value, there are many ways to create passive income. You could sell digital products like ebooks or courses, take up affiliate marketing in which you promote other company’s products and earn a commission when you sell that item to your audience, build a community and charge people to be a part of it, create software and sell that, among other avenues. Ask your audience directly what would serve them best, or look at what they’re saying on Twitter, Facebook or other websites, to find out what problems they have and how you could help solve them.

Flynn has created many different products. While his LEED exam is what got him started, he has both earned a commission from selling other people’s products and offered a commission to others who would sell his wares, and also recently created his first software, SmartPodcastPlayer.com, after realizing that most online podcast players offered only the basic stop/start/volume features. He hired a development team to create a superior one, which was a success from day 1. “We sold out 250 beta licenses in less than 24 hours, because I was addressing a need but also, I had built up an audience and trust with them … When you build that amount of trust with your audience, whatever you come out with, they will love.”

If you’re worried about launching a new product, and think you might need some feedback to make it really good, Flynn recommends “pre-selling” an idea — for instance, offering a limited number of spots or seats into, say, a course you create and giving the test group specialized attention so you can see how to improve the content. Once it’s revised (or, if it’s software, once all the bugs are removed), you could open it up to your whole audience.

10. As you start to make money, remember tip 1 — that profit shouldn’t be your main motivation.

Once you start to see some success, don’t be led astray by the money. While Flynn does use affiliate marketing to make money, he only ever recommends products that he has personally used and likes. He is inundated by offers to earn $50 per sale through commission on products he has never even tried. “I’m like, ‘I don’t even know you, I don’t know what this product can do, and I don’t know if this product will help my audience.’ I only use products I’ve used before, because that trust you have with your audience is the most important thing in the world.” He says if you do recommend a product for the incredible commission but your audience has a bad experience with it, your credibility will be shot.

“The moment you start to do things for money, the moment you start to lie in your sales marketing copy, the moment you start to put dishonesty in your work is the moment you should reconsider why you’re doing that work in the first place,” says Flynn.

In order not to succumb to that, Flynn says it’s important to know your motivation. “Passive income is important to me not just for the financial security but so I can spend time with my family,” he says. “I’ve been able to work from home and witness all my kids’ firsts. I have a one-year-old and a four-year-old, and that’s what drives me and gets me pushing through those hard times and why I keep creating new products and why I want to help other people do the same thing.”

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